Monday, 20 July 2020

The City of Mandurah has today introduced a new organisational brand, designed to clearly convey to potential investors, visitors, community service partners and all levels of government, what matters to Mandurah and why.

Mayor Rhys Williams said Council had recognised the need for a strong brand for Mandurah that would help set the image and reputation of this place, now and into the future.

“A strong brand has always been important, but more so now than ever, we need to be loud and clear about Mandurah’s priorities, needs, and aspirations so we can confidently evolve to become a 21st century city without losing sight of those things that make us unique,” he said.

“Every local government area in WA and beyond is seeking investment, support, engagement and involvement for the betterment of their community, and we need to be clear about who we are, what we value and what we aspire to be, so we can confidently and successfully advocate for and deliver on those things that are important to our own local community.

“Importantly, while this brand embraces the City’s organisational values, it is not just inward facing, and has instead been developed with direct and meaningful input from the Mandurah people.

“This brand represents our community stories and growth, from our Indigenous Noongar first people, to the many people who are proud to call Mandurah home today, and those stories are central to our identity.”

Mandurah’s new place aspiration, “Woven by waterways, a city with a village heart”, is reflected within the new brand, and is a culmination of community ideas and input collected during the Mandurah Matters engagement project.

“When you look at the elements that make up the new identity it’s easy to see that our Indigenous heritage and storytelling about our water-based lifestyle take pride of place,” Mayor Williams said.

“It helps us to understand the story of our place, recognising the importance of our past as we take bold steps into our future.”

One of the first steps in rolling out the new brand will be the dual naming of city-owned buildings.

The Council Chambers (Boordiya Mia), Administration Building (Yoolin Mia), Mandurah Seniors and Community Centre (Dandjoo Kaadadjan Mia) and Billy Dower Youth Centre (Moorditj Mia) will all receive dual name branding in Noongar language in 2020/21.

“One of the elements at the heart of who we are is around reconciliation, and we’re so proud to be leaders in this space,” Mayor Williams said.

“Dual naming our buildings and meeting places is an important step in celebrating and preserving traditional language of our first people.

“Our local Aboriginal people will be able to see part of themselves reflected in our places and spaces, and that is so important. It also presents an important learning opportunity for the whole community - young and old - and reinforces our commitment to building meaningful relationships which is a key focus of our Reconciliation Action Plan.”

The rollout of the new City brand will be gradual, starting with a new-look City website, which currently attracts around 50,000 visitors each month.

Media Contact: Holly Sutton, Media and Public Relations Consultant 9550 3727, 0448 941 011 or media@mandurah.wa.gov.au

The brand identity is made up of eight distinct parts that reflect Mandurah’s history and evolution and creates a strong sense of place:

  • M – Mandurah/Mandjoogoordap, recognition and pride
  • Sails – representing life on the water
  • Seabird – representing coastal, freedom, peaceful
  • Bridges – representing connection, thriving city
  • Waterways – representing the Wogaal, dreamtime connection, beauty, energy
  • Boats bow – reflects Mandurah’s history, fishing and crabbing, recreation
  • Meeting Place – meeting place of the heart, people of Mandurah
  • Ripples – represents water, movement and our energy

The colour palette of the new identity has been chosen to reflect the colours of the landscapes of Mandurah and its connection to the land and water. It has been inspired by the six Noongar seasons - Birak, Kambarang, Djilba, Mookaroo, Djiran and Boonaroo.